Heads Up for Personality Portraits

Stefanie Comp copy

It has to be more than a snap shot to get the attention of any casting director.

Head shots are all about connecting with the client in a way that brings out that person’s character and uniqueness.  The above comp was photographed this week in the studio and is a pretty good example of what I’m talking about.  Peter Hurley says it best when he says “Shebang” after seeing that special moment come across his viewfinder.  Jay Maisel calls this Gesture.  The ability to bring out personality comes with loads of practice and lots of trial and error.  Some people like Hurley use funny directions.  Others have their own way of connecting with the real person in front of the camera.

Here are a few tips.   1.  Make the subject feel comfortable.  There is nothing more horrible than having a strange person yell smile at you and expect you to react in a meaningful way.  Bring out real expressions with real  life dialog and direction.  I start off by suggesting the subject make a funny face.  The real expression comes after the person reacts to his or her antics.  2.  Make the subject believe they look amazing in their photos.  Many people have a lousy self image and it is the photographers job to show how great they look.  I try to shoot tethered to a lab top so the subject can get a sensed of what their photo will look like.  3.  Keep changing the pose so that the subject doesn’t get bored.  Nothing worse that firing off a dozen frames and having nothing different to show for it. 4.  Be friendly and honest.  Nothing ruins a personality session like a phony photographer. Be real.  5.  Have fun.  This will be good for you and for your client and will result in some pretty great photography.  6 Above all have your equipment and lighting set and ready to go.  Batteries charged, light readings made and camera set and ready to shoot.  A sure way to ruin a photo session is to have a light malfunction or camera not work properly.

Contact me about my small group and individual photography sessions.  I’d love to share some of the information I’ve gleaned from a 40+ year career in photography

 

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